US Franciscan News

Fraternitas 02.2020 (No. 274)

Fraternitas 02.2020 (No. 274)

The February 2020 edition of ‘Fraternitas’ is now online and can be downloaded in several languages. PDF:  English – Español – Italiano  – Deutsch – Français – Hrvatski – Polski – Português DOC:  English – Español – Italiano  – Deutsch...

read more
Minister General: Back in Rome after Recovery

Minister General: Back in Rome after Recovery

My dear Brothers, May the Lord give you peace! I wish to confirm reports about my return to the General Curia. It is good to be back “home” and to once again resume the duties entrusted to me by the Lord and by you my brothers. Throughout the period of my...

read more
Il Paese del Sole, Friar Alessandro’s Fourth Music Album

Il Paese del Sole, Friar Alessandro’s Fourth Music Album

Friar Alessandro has launched his 4th album, Il Paese del Sole, with Encore Music in conjunction with the Franciscan Foreign Missions to which the Artist’s royalties go in their entirety. It is an album which pays homage to the Italian genius in producing melodic and...

read more
Eighth Centenary of the Franciscan Protomartyrs

Eighth Centenary of the Franciscan Protomartyrs

In 1220 the Friars Minor Berardo da Calvi, Accursio and Adiuto da Narni, Ottone da Stroncone and Pietro da San Gemini were killed in Morocco. At the sight of their torn bodies, the Augustinian Canon Fernando da Lisbon decided to put on the Franciscan habit taking the...

read more
Beyond Damietta: from Francis and the Sultan to the Future

Beyond Damietta: from Francis and the Sultan to the Future

2019 witnessed a number of events recalling the encounter between St. Francis of Assisi and the Ayyūbid Sultan al-Malik al-Kāmil eight hundred years ago. Now that the anniversary has passed, a roundtable discussion looks to the future of Muslim-Christian relations,...

read more
JPIC Newsletter: CONTACT (10-12.2019)

JPIC Newsletter: CONTACT (10-12.2019)

Peace and all Good! We present you the recent edition of JPIC Newsletter “CONTACT” (October – December 2019) The “CONTACT”is an open space where you can share stories and information on your JPIC ministry. You can send your stories to pax@ofm.org English – CONTACT...

read more
Fraternitas 01.2020 (No. 273)

Fraternitas 01.2020 (No. 273)

The January 2020 edition of ‘Fraternitas’ is now online and can be downloaded in several languages. PDF:  English – Español – Italiano  – Deutsch – Français – Hrvatski – Polski – Português DOC:  English – Español – Italiano  – Deutsch...

read more
Participation in COP25, Madrid

Participation in COP25, Madrid

The UN Climate Conference (Cop25) began on Dec. 2 ended on Dec. 15, which was two days longer than its original schedule. The JPIC Commission of the Holy Korean Martyrs Province of Korea has participated along with its ally NGOs. Cop 25 was inaugurated with an...

read more
Christmas Letter of the Minister General 2019

Christmas Letter of the Minister General 2019

We are only a few days away from the celebration of the Lord’s Nativity, and I see this as an opportunity for each of us to prepare ourselves personally and as a community to enter deeply into the mysteries of the Incarnate Word. We are grateful for the Message of the...

read more

US Franciscan News

Fraternitas 02.2020 (No. 274)

Fraternitas 02.2020 (No. 274)

The February 2020 edition of ‘Fraternitas’ is now online and can be downloaded in several languages. PDF:  English – Español – Italiano  – Deutsch – Français – Hrvatski – Polski – Português DOC:  English – Español – Italiano  – Deutsch...

read more
Minister General: Back in Rome after Recovery

Minister General: Back in Rome after Recovery

My dear Brothers, May the Lord give you peace! I wish to confirm reports about my return to the General Curia. It is good to be back “home” and to once again resume the duties entrusted to me by the Lord and by you my brothers. Throughout the period of my...

read more
Il Paese del Sole, Friar Alessandro’s Fourth Music Album

Il Paese del Sole, Friar Alessandro’s Fourth Music Album

Friar Alessandro has launched his 4th album, Il Paese del Sole, with Encore Music in conjunction with the Franciscan Foreign Missions to which the Artist’s royalties go in their entirety. It is an album which pays homage to the Italian genius in producing melodic and...

read more
Eighth Centenary of the Franciscan Protomartyrs

Eighth Centenary of the Franciscan Protomartyrs

In 1220 the Friars Minor Berardo da Calvi, Accursio and Adiuto da Narni, Ottone da Stroncone and Pietro da San Gemini were killed in Morocco. At the sight of their torn bodies, the Augustinian Canon Fernando da Lisbon decided to put on the Franciscan habit taking the...

read more

Recent #FriarFriday Reflections

Recent #FriarFriday Reflections

Franciscan News on Facebook

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

Homily for the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

In the passage that we proclaim today from St. Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians, he speaks to us of what he calls a “hidden” wisdom. To better understand what St. Paul is saying, it might be helpful to keep the Jewish apocalyptic worldview in mind. This particular worldview maintained that the secrets of the future had been written down at the beginning of time and were preserved somewhere safe from the eyes of humankind. When the fullness of time at last dawns, these secrets will be revealed.

Consequently, this school of thought and, in this case St. Paul, divides time into two parts; namely, this present age of waiting and the future age when all things will be made known.
St. Paul speaks of the age to come in one of the most poetic verses of his writing. It has been translated in many different ways from the Greek and is rendered thus in the International Standard version: “No eye has seen, no ear has heard, and no mind has imagined the things that God has prepared for those who love him.”

I find myself going back to this verse quite frequently. Each time I ponder it, I come to a very clear realization of how small my human understanding is when it comes to God. This verse reminds me of the limits of my human nature, particularly the limits of my human mind. Throughout history, humankind has plumbed the depths of all the sciences, of all the various philosophies, of the many schools of art, and of the various endeavors of the men and women of history. Yet St. Paul reminds us that human wisdom is so shallow when compared to the depth that is God and so miniscule when compared to the immense nature of God.

St. Paul has told us that the wisdom of God seems foolish to us, that the strength of God seems like weakness to us. The world looks at the crucified Jesus which hangs on the walls of our homes and churches and sees failure. You might remember that last week we heard St. Paul say that he wished to know nothing else but Jesus Crucified. Indeed, Jesus hanging on a cross is the kerygma, the basic message of our faith. This is the first thing the apostles preached after they were filled with the Holy Spirit. Jesus died on a cross and rose three days later. Today’s reading, however, is not the kerygma of the Gospel, for St. Paul tells us that he is speaking not to those who have never heard the message. Today he announces that he is speaking to those who are mature. In other words, he is speaking to those who have heard the message and know that this so-called mystery is constantly being revealed to us as we go through life. Each time we experience a loss, each time we are confronted with death, be it our own impending death or the death of a loved one, a little more of the mystery of the death and resurrection of Jesus is revealed to us.

Jesus teaches us through his own death that the only way to draw close to the mystery of love is by dying to ourselves. We are called to put our needs second and the needs of others first just as Jesus did. We have been taught that when we were baptized, we were baptized into his death. His death is quite literally the mystery of love. If we wish to understand the secret of love, then we have to understand that loving others means following Jesus to Calvary. I say from the outset that none of us will ever completely understand this kind of love because God’s wisdom has never entered the human heart completely. So as I preach this morning, I realize clearly that this mystery cannot be understood through my words. It can only be understood through deeds, and the deed that explains it most clearly is that which Jesus did for us. Through his death and resurrection he has given us eternal life in heaven.

Perhaps the most frequently asked question that is posed to me is, “What will heaven be like?” Every believer wants to know. Most of us have pictured what it must be like. Whenever you think you have it figured out, just remember, “Eye has not seen, ear has not heard, it has never entered the human mind what God has ready for those who love Him.”

Fr. Lawrence Jagdfeld, O.F.M.
... See MoreSee Less

Homily for the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time In the passage that we proclaim today from St. Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians, he speaks to us of what he calls a “hidden” wisdom. To better understand what St. Paul is saying, it might be helpful to keep the Jewish apocalyptic worldview in mind. This particular worldview maintained that the secrets of the future had been written down at the beginning of time and were preserved somewhere safe from the eyes of humankind. When the fullness of time at last dawns, these secrets will be revealed. Consequently, this school of thought and, in this case St. Paul, divides time into two parts; namely, this present age of waiting and the future age when all things will be made known. St. Paul speaks of the age to come in one of the most poetic verses of his writing. It has been translated in many different ways from the Greek and is rendered thus in the International Standard version: “No eye has seen, no ear has heard, and no mind has imagined the things that God has prepared for those who love him.” I find myself going back to this verse quite frequently. Each time I ponder it, I come to a very clear realization of how small my human understanding is when it comes to God. This verse reminds me of the limits of my human nature, particularly the limits of my human mind. Throughout history, humankind has plumbed the depths of all the sciences, of all the various philosophies, of the many schools of art, and of the various endeavors of the men and women of history. Yet St. Paul reminds us that human wisdom is so shallow when compared to the depth that is God and so miniscule when compared to the immense nature of God. St. Paul has told us that the wisdom of God seems foolish to us, that the strength of God seems like weakness to us. The world looks at the crucified Jesus which hangs on the walls of our homes and churches and sees failure. You might remember that last week we heard St. Paul say that he wished to know nothing else but Jesus Crucified. Indeed, Jesus hanging on a cross is the kerygma, the basic message of our faith. This is the first thing the apostles preached after they were filled with the Holy Spirit. Jesus died on a cross and rose three days later. Today’s reading, however, is not the kerygma of the Gospel, for St. Paul tells us that he is speaking not to those who have never heard the message. Today he announces that he is speaking to those who are mature. In other words, he is speaking to those who have heard the message and know that this so-called mystery is constantly being revealed to us as we go through life. Each time we experience a loss, each time we are confronted with death, be it our own impending death or the death of a loved one, a little more of the mystery of the death and resurrection of Jesus is revealed to us. Jesus teaches us through his own death that the only way to draw close to the mystery of love is by dying to ourselves. We are called to put our needs second and the needs of others first just as Jesus did. We have been taught that when we were baptized, we were baptized into his death. His death is quite literally the mystery of love. If we wish to understand the secret of love, then we have to understand that loving others means following Jesus to Calvary. I say from the outset that none of us will ever completely understand this kind of love because God’s wisdom has never entered the human heart completely. So as I preach this morning, I realize clearly that this mystery cannot be understood through my words. It can only be understood through deeds, and the deed that explains it most clearly is that which Jesus did for us. Through his death and resurrection he has given us eternal life in heaven. Perhaps the most frequently asked question that is posed to me is, “What will heaven be like?” Every believer wants to know. Most of us have pictured what it must be like. Whenever you think you have it figured out, just remember, “Eye has not seen, ear has not heard, it has never entered the human mind what God has ready for those who love Him.” Fr. Lawrence Jagdfeld, O.F.M.

Are you ready to flex your spiritual muscles for Lent? Get started on your Lenten journey and to sign up for your free copy of Lent with Maximilian Kolbe: Daily Reflections, by Carol Ann Morrow, published by Franciscan Media.
https://www.stanthony.org/lent/
... See MoreSee Less

Are you ready to flex your spiritual muscles for Lent? Get started on your Lenten journey and to sign up for your free copy of Lent with Maximilian Kolbe: Daily Reflections, by Carol Ann Morrow, published by Franciscan Media. https://www.stanthony.org/lent/

“Our mission in the Holy Land for 800 years has been to welcome pilgrims,” says Fr. Greg Friedman, OFM, pilgrim guide to the Holy Land at the Monastery of the Holy Land.
https://cmc-terrasanta.org/embed/en/…
... See MoreSee Less

“Our mission in the Holy Land for 800 years has been to welcome pilgrims,” says Fr. Greg Friedman, OFM, pilgrim guide to the Holy Land at the Monastery of the Holy Land. https://cmc-terrasanta.org/embed/en/media/terra-santa-news/19356/holy-land:-a-pilgrimage-in-the-middle-of-winter?fbclid=IwAR2HrnG_IM5vnyTKpl936vwUpfDe9SN520izZcN-TdeETQok9hQ8sqywCCUImage attachment

“You have heard that it was said to your ancestors,
You shall not kill; and whoever kills will be liable to judgment.
But I say to you, whoever is angry with your sister or brother
will be liable to judgment."

Author Michael Hardin, in “The Jesus Driven Life,” comments on this Gospel passage:

‘…the way of the Kingdom of God means that the way we relate to everyone changes. Not just our friends, but also those we despise and those who can’t stand us. It is not easy to love the unlovely. When we are attacked, we attack back, when we are threatened, we threaten. Our natural posture is defensiveness. This is true not only on a personal level but also on a political one. Have you ever noticed that when someone attacks you it is always unjust but when you ‘attack’ another it is always just?... Jesus says that to be angry is the same as murder. When you get angry the first thing you do is to have this sort of inane conversation in your head. They said this, I will say that, they will respond thus, I will have that response, etc. Notice how you always win this battle!

‘Jesus says that the Christian life does not consist of these mental battles. Instead we are to make peace in every way for “Blessed are the peacemakers.” More than that, retaliation is not an aspect of Christian existence. When Christians (not people in general) are hassled or persecuted, it is not part of their calling to "get them back." Christianity is not a gang where if one member is suffering at the hands of rivals, it sends out its members to get the other gang. Instead we are called to "love our enemies." How different would the world be today, if so-called Christian America had, instead of announcing war after 9/11, offered forgiveness?’

Am I able to practice what I preach--or should I just ignore this Sunday's challenge from the teachings of Jesus?
... See MoreSee Less

“You have heard that it was said to your ancestors, You shall not kill; and whoever kills will be liable to judgment. But I say to you, whoever is angry with your sister or brother will be liable to judgment. Author Michael Hardin, in “The Jesus Driven Life,” comments on this Gospel passage: ‘…the way of the Kingdom of God means that the way we relate to everyone changes. Not just our friends, but also those we despise and those who can’t stand us. It is not easy to love the unlovely. When we are attacked, we attack back, when we are threatened, we threaten. Our natural posture is defensiveness. This is true not only on a personal level but also on a political one. Have you ever noticed that when someone attacks you it is always unjust but when you ‘attack’ another it is always just?... Jesus says that to be angry is the same as murder. When you get angry the first thing you do is to have this sort of inane conversation in your head. They said this, I will say that, they will respond thus, I will have that response, etc. Notice how you always win this battle! ‘Jesus says that the Christian life does not consist of these mental battles. Instead we are to make peace in every way for “Blessed are the peacemakers.” More than that, retaliation is not an aspect of Christian existence. When Christians (not people in general) are hassled or persecuted, it is not part of their calling to get them back. Christianity is not a gang where if one member is suffering at the hands of rivals, it sends out its members to get the other gang. Instead we are called to love our enemies. How different would the world be today, if so-called Christian America had, instead of announcing war after 9/11, offered forgiveness?’ Am I able to practice what I preach--or should I just ignore this Sundays challenge from the teachings of Jesus?

Let all that you do be done with love. #love #franciscan #valentines #corinthians #bibleverse ... See MoreSee Less

Let all that you do be done with love. #love #franciscan #valentines #corinthians #bibleverse

4 days ago

Southwest Franciscans

“For much of his life, Rohr has used suffering as a spiritual tool to help him learn to be humble. ‘I pray for one humiliation a day,’ he told me. ‘It doesn’t have to be major.’ Three years ago, Rohr was diagnosed with an aggressive form of prostate cancer. A year and a half ago, while alone in his home, he had a severe heart attack. He rang a friend, who ordered him to call 911 for an ambulance. Rohr refused; he didn’t want to die in the presence of strangers, so his friend raced over to rush him to the hospital. As they pulled out of his driveway, Rohr said goodbye to the little house where he’d lived for twenty years, the trees, the dumpster. ‘I was ready to go,’ he told me. ‘But, anyway, here I am.’ Rohr is undergoing chemotherapy, and the cancer is now in remission, though he has reconciled himself to his mortality. ‘What did we ever lose by dying?’ he asked me.”

What would it feel like to welcome personal humiliation—one small death to the small self—as a daily opportunity? What you need take to make this a daily practice? Read the full story at http://ow.ly/TMvo50ykCcw

Illustration of Richard Rohr by Ohni Lisle.
... See MoreSee Less

Load more

Franciscan News on Facebook

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

Homily for the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

In the passage that we proclaim today from St. Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians, he speaks to us of what he calls a “hidden” wisdom. To better understand what St. Paul is saying, it might be helpful to keep the Jewish apocalyptic worldview in mind. This particular worldview maintained that the secrets of the future had been written down at the beginning of time and were preserved somewhere safe from the eyes of humankind. When the fullness of time at last dawns, these secrets will be revealed.

Consequently, this school of thought and, in this case St. Paul, divides time into two parts; namely, this present age of waiting and the future age when all things will be made known.
St. Paul speaks of the age to come in one of the most poetic verses of his writing. It has been translated in many different ways from the Greek and is rendered thus in the International Standard version: “No eye has seen, no ear has heard, and no mind has imagined the things that God has prepared for those who love him.”

I find myself going back to this verse quite frequently. Each time I ponder it, I come to a very clear realization of how small my human understanding is when it comes to God. This verse reminds me of the limits of my human nature, particularly the limits of my human mind. Throughout history, humankind has plumbed the depths of all the sciences, of all the various philosophies, of the many schools of art, and of the various endeavors of the men and women of history. Yet St. Paul reminds us that human wisdom is so shallow when compared to the depth that is God and so miniscule when compared to the immense nature of God.

St. Paul has told us that the wisdom of God seems foolish to us, that the strength of God seems like weakness to us. The world looks at the crucified Jesus which hangs on the walls of our homes and churches and sees failure. You might remember that last week we heard St. Paul say that he wished to know nothing else but Jesus Crucified. Indeed, Jesus hanging on a cross is the kerygma, the basic message of our faith. This is the first thing the apostles preached after they were filled with the Holy Spirit. Jesus died on a cross and rose three days later. Today’s reading, however, is not the kerygma of the Gospel, for St. Paul tells us that he is speaking not to those who have never heard the message. Today he announces that he is speaking to those who are mature. In other words, he is speaking to those who have heard the message and know that this so-called mystery is constantly being revealed to us as we go through life. Each time we experience a loss, each time we are confronted with death, be it our own impending death or the death of a loved one, a little more of the mystery of the death and resurrection of Jesus is revealed to us.

Jesus teaches us through his own death that the only way to draw close to the mystery of love is by dying to ourselves. We are called to put our needs second and the needs of others first just as Jesus did. We have been taught that when we were baptized, we were baptized into his death. His death is quite literally the mystery of love. If we wish to understand the secret of love, then we have to understand that loving others means following Jesus to Calvary. I say from the outset that none of us will ever completely understand this kind of love because God’s wisdom has never entered the human heart completely. So as I preach this morning, I realize clearly that this mystery cannot be understood through my words. It can only be understood through deeds, and the deed that explains it most clearly is that which Jesus did for us. Through his death and resurrection he has given us eternal life in heaven.

Perhaps the most frequently asked question that is posed to me is, “What will heaven be like?” Every believer wants to know. Most of us have pictured what it must be like. Whenever you think you have it figured out, just remember, “Eye has not seen, ear has not heard, it has never entered the human mind what God has ready for those who love Him.”

Fr. Lawrence Jagdfeld, O.F.M.
... See MoreSee Less

Homily for the Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time In the passage that we proclaim today from St. Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians, he speaks to us of what he calls a “hidden” wisdom. To better understand what St. Paul is saying, it might be helpful to keep the Jewish apocalyptic worldview in mind. This particular worldview maintained that the secrets of the future had been written down at the beginning of time and were preserved somewhere safe from the eyes of humankind. When the fullness of time at last dawns, these secrets will be revealed. Consequently, this school of thought and, in this case St. Paul, divides time into two parts; namely, this present age of waiting and the future age when all things will be made known. St. Paul speaks of the age to come in one of the most poetic verses of his writing. It has been translated in many different ways from the Greek and is rendered thus in the International Standard version: “No eye has seen, no ear has heard, and no mind has imagined the things that God has prepared for those who love him.” I find myself going back to this verse quite frequently. Each time I ponder it, I come to a very clear realization of how small my human understanding is when it comes to God. This verse reminds me of the limits of my human nature, particularly the limits of my human mind. Throughout history, humankind has plumbed the depths of all the sciences, of all the various philosophies, of the many schools of art, and of the various endeavors of the men and women of history. Yet St. Paul reminds us that human wisdom is so shallow when compared to the depth that is God and so miniscule when compared to the immense nature of God. St. Paul has told us that the wisdom of God seems foolish to us, that the strength of God seems like weakness to us. The world looks at the crucified Jesus which hangs on the walls of our homes and churches and sees failure. You might remember that last week we heard St. Paul say that he wished to know nothing else but Jesus Crucified. Indeed, Jesus hanging on a cross is the kerygma, the basic message of our faith. This is the first thing the apostles preached after they were filled with the Holy Spirit. Jesus died on a cross and rose three days later. Today’s reading, however, is not the kerygma of the Gospel, for St. Paul tells us that he is speaking not to those who have never heard the message. Today he announces that he is speaking to those who are mature. In other words, he is speaking to those who have heard the message and know that this so-called mystery is constantly being revealed to us as we go through life. Each time we experience a loss, each time we are confronted with death, be it our own impending death or the death of a loved one, a little more of the mystery of the death and resurrection of Jesus is revealed to us. Jesus teaches us through his own death that the only way to draw close to the mystery of love is by dying to ourselves. We are called to put our needs second and the needs of others first just as Jesus did. We have been taught that when we were baptized, we were baptized into his death. His death is quite literally the mystery of love. If we wish to understand the secret of love, then we have to understand that loving others means following Jesus to Calvary. I say from the outset that none of us will ever completely understand this kind of love because God’s wisdom has never entered the human heart completely. So as I preach this morning, I realize clearly that this mystery cannot be understood through my words. It can only be understood through deeds, and the deed that explains it most clearly is that which Jesus did for us. Through his death and resurrection he has given us eternal life in heaven. Perhaps the most frequently asked question that is posed to me is, “What will heaven be like?” Every believer wants to know. Most of us have pictured what it must be like. Whenever you think you have it figured out, just remember, “Eye has not seen, ear has not heard, it has never entered the human mind what God has ready for those who love Him.” Fr. Lawrence Jagdfeld, O.F.M.

Are you ready to flex your spiritual muscles for Lent? Get started on your Lenten journey and to sign up for your free copy of Lent with Maximilian Kolbe: Daily Reflections, by Carol Ann Morrow, published by Franciscan Media.
https://www.stanthony.org/lent/
... See MoreSee Less

Are you ready to flex your spiritual muscles for Lent? Get started on your Lenten journey and to sign up for your free copy of Lent with Maximilian Kolbe: Daily Reflections, by Carol Ann Morrow, published by Franciscan Media. https://www.stanthony.org/lent/

“Our mission in the Holy Land for 800 years has been to welcome pilgrims,” says Fr. Greg Friedman, OFM, pilgrim guide to the Holy Land at the Monastery of the Holy Land.
https://cmc-terrasanta.org/embed/en/…
... See MoreSee Less

“Our mission in the Holy Land for 800 years has been to welcome pilgrims,” says Fr. Greg Friedman, OFM, pilgrim guide to the Holy Land at the Monastery of the Holy Land. https://cmc-terrasanta.org/embed/en/media/terra-santa-news/19356/holy-land:-a-pilgrimage-in-the-middle-of-winter?fbclid=IwAR2HrnG_IM5vnyTKpl936vwUpfDe9SN520izZcN-TdeETQok9hQ8sqywCCUImage attachment

“You have heard that it was said to your ancestors,
You shall not kill; and whoever kills will be liable to judgment.
But I say to you, whoever is angry with your sister or brother
will be liable to judgment."

Author Michael Hardin, in “The Jesus Driven Life,” comments on this Gospel passage:

‘…the way of the Kingdom of God means that the way we relate to everyone changes. Not just our friends, but also those we despise and those who can’t stand us. It is not easy to love the unlovely. When we are attacked, we attack back, when we are threatened, we threaten. Our natural posture is defensiveness. This is true not only on a personal level but also on a political one. Have you ever noticed that when someone attacks you it is always unjust but when you ‘attack’ another it is always just?... Jesus says that to be angry is the same as murder. When you get angry the first thing you do is to have this sort of inane conversation in your head. They said this, I will say that, they will respond thus, I will have that response, etc. Notice how you always win this battle!

‘Jesus says that the Christian life does not consist of these mental battles. Instead we are to make peace in every way for “Blessed are the peacemakers.” More than that, retaliation is not an aspect of Christian existence. When Christians (not people in general) are hassled or persecuted, it is not part of their calling to "get them back." Christianity is not a gang where if one member is suffering at the hands of rivals, it sends out its members to get the other gang. Instead we are called to "love our enemies." How different would the world be today, if so-called Christian America had, instead of announcing war after 9/11, offered forgiveness?’

Am I able to practice what I preach--or should I just ignore this Sunday's challenge from the teachings of Jesus?
... See MoreSee Less

“You have heard that it was said to your ancestors, You shall not kill; and whoever kills will be liable to judgment. But I say to you, whoever is angry with your sister or brother will be liable to judgment. Author Michael Hardin, in “The Jesus Driven Life,” comments on this Gospel passage: ‘…the way of the Kingdom of God means that the way we relate to everyone changes. Not just our friends, but also those we despise and those who can’t stand us. It is not easy to love the unlovely. When we are attacked, we attack back, when we are threatened, we threaten. Our natural posture is defensiveness. This is true not only on a personal level but also on a political one. Have you ever noticed that when someone attacks you it is always unjust but when you ‘attack’ another it is always just?... Jesus says that to be angry is the same as murder. When you get angry the first thing you do is to have this sort of inane conversation in your head. They said this, I will say that, they will respond thus, I will have that response, etc. Notice how you always win this battle! ‘Jesus says that the Christian life does not consist of these mental battles. Instead we are to make peace in every way for “Blessed are the peacemakers.” More than that, retaliation is not an aspect of Christian existence. When Christians (not people in general) are hassled or persecuted, it is not part of their calling to get them back. Christianity is not a gang where if one member is suffering at the hands of rivals, it sends out its members to get the other gang. Instead we are called to love our enemies. How different would the world be today, if so-called Christian America had, instead of announcing war after 9/11, offered forgiveness?’ Am I able to practice what I preach--or should I just ignore this Sundays challenge from the teachings of Jesus?
Load more

Pin It on Pinterest