News from US Franciscans

Juntos Como Hermanos 2018

Franciscan friars involved in Hispanic ministry gathered in Washington DC Sept. 17-20 for the 6th annual Juntos Como Hermanos (“Together as Brothers”) gathering.

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Friars Vote to Recommend One US Province

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Voicing their support for the revitalization of Franciscan life in the US, six provinces of the Order of Friars Minor have voted to form one new organization. On May 30, the friars of each of the six provinces voted at meetings in their communities...

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News from US Franciscans

Juntos Como Hermanos 2018

Franciscan friars involved in Hispanic ministry gathered in Washington DC Sept. 17-20 for the 6th annual Juntos Como Hermanos (“Together as Brothers”) gathering.

read more

Recent #FriarFriday Reflections

Recent #FriarFriday Reflections

News from the OFM English-speaking Conference

ofm.org posts

New Custos in England

Br. Aidan McGrath OFM, the provincial minister of the Province of Ireland, has announced that Br. Michael Copps OFM has been elected as custos of the Custody of the Immaculate Conception in Great Britain. The ESC's prayers and best wishes go to Br. Michael and to all...

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Merry Christmas 2017

t happened, three years prior to his death, that St. Francis of Assisi decided to celebrate at the town of Greccio the memory of the birth of the Child Jesus with the greatest possible solemnity, in order to arouse devotion. So that...

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Conference meets with General Definitorium | Fall Newsletter

ENGLISH SPEAKING CONFERENCE | ORDER OF FRIARS MINOR                                                                                                         Thomas S. Washburn, OFMPO Box 61128  • New Bedford, Massachusetts 02746 • exec@escofm.org                       ...

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US Franciscans look to future renewal with hope

each made simple statements of why they voted as they did:Kevin Mullen, of Holy Name Province, said, “One new Province provides us with the opportunity to have a vital fraternal experience.  With regard to mission, one new Province allows us to take the core values of...

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US Franciscans statement on Charlottesville violence

8/17/2017 0 Comments FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE | August 2017 As followers of St. Francis of Assisi, the patron of peace, we, the Franciscans Friars of the United States join with the many public and religious leaders and fellow-citizens who have condemned the recent...

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New Custos in England

Br. Aidan McGrath OFM, the provincial minister of the Province of Ireland, has announced that Br. Michael Copps OFM has been elected as custos of the Custody of the Immaculate Conception in Great Britain. The ESC's prayers and best wishes go to Br. Michael and to all...

read more

Merry Christmas 2017

t happened, three years prior to his death, that St. Francis of Assisi decided to celebrate at the town of Greccio the memory of the birth of the Child Jesus with the greatest possible solemnity, in order to arouse devotion. So that...

read more

Conference meets with General Definitorium | Fall Newsletter

ENGLISH SPEAKING CONFERENCE | ORDER OF FRIARS MINOR                                                                                                         Thomas S. Washburn, OFMPO Box 61128  • New Bedford, Massachusetts 02746 • exec@escofm.org                       ...

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News from the General Curia in Rome

ofm.org posts

Fraternitas 11.2018 (No. 260)

The November 2018 edition of ‘Fraternitas’ is now online and can be downloaded in several languages. PDF:  English – Español – Italiano – Deutsch  – Français – Hrvatski – Polski – Português DOC:...

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Document of the 2018 OFM Plenary Council

Those who have ears, let them listen to what the Spirit is saying … to the Friars Minor today  DOCUMENT OF THE OFM PLENARY COUNCIL 12-28 June 2018 Nairobi, Kenya Download the complete text in PDF: English – Español – Italiano – Français – Hrvatski – Português      ...

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Deepavali Greetings

We wish the people of India and all her leaders, both secular and religious, a very happy Deepavali, the Festival of Lights. It is indeed a joyful and a spiritual experience to see all the homes and offices and worship places lit with millions of diyas (Lights) and...

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News from our Facebook Page

2 weeks ago

Lawrence Jagdfeld

Brothers:

The printer had some difficulties with the Ordo this year. I just received the shipment last Thursday and immediately started mailing them. I hope to finish by the end of the week.

Lawrence Jagdfeld, OFM
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2 weeks ago

USfranciscans

With faith in the resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ, we commend our brother, Fr. Fred Radtke, O.F.M., to your prayers. Fr. Fred died today, November 5, in Manitowoc, Wisconsin. Funeral arrangements are pending. ... See MoreSee Less

 

Comment on Facebook

RIP

RIP 🙏 🙏

RIP

Rest on peace and strength for his family💝

May he RIP

God bless you.

Your smile will be missed. Adieu.

Rest In Peace

RIP Father!!!

Rip

RIP

Eternal rest grant him o Lord.

Eternal peace Father

Rest in peace, Father.🙏💒💖🌿

Prayers

Prayers.

RIP Father!!!

Prayers assured for his eternal repose...condolences to the OFMs...

Prayers

May be rest in peace and contentment with the Lord.

He'll be heaven to watch our elections

😓🙏🙏🙏🙏

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2 weeks ago

USfranciscans

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Comment on Facebook

🧐 magnificent u can see there where alot of good news spread across es the new Bethlehem where sir cole from these day's spread's the word and call's apon thee lord with thank's giving praise's as you see the man walking has great ear sounding tec as his wireless cell phone ping's the raf 4 full cell signal 4 good singalong

2 weeks ago

USfranciscans

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Comment on Facebook

Beautiful picture.

Amen

Lovely

love this.. between heaven and earth!

Very beautiful!🙏🏻

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News from our Facebook Page

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Local US Franciscan News

The Franciscan HOLY LAND Gift Shop at the Franciscan Monastery:

-Features the products made by these Christians in the Holy Land, helping them live and thrive in the region. All of the artisans are fairly compensated for their work.
-Makes it possible for people to purchase authentic products from the Holy Land without traveling, such as those made from olive wood and mother-of-pearl.
-Connects people to the lives of Holy Land Christians by sharing their unique stories – the many challenges they face and the rich history they have in the region.

Help support the mission of the Franciscan friars here: bit.ly/2rPVdWv
... See MoreSee Less

The Franciscan HOLY LAND Gift Shop at the Franciscan Monastery:-Features the products made by these Christians in the Holy Land, helping them live and thrive in the region. All of the artisans are fairly compensated for their work.
-Makes it possible for people to purchase authentic products from the Holy Land without traveling, such as those made from olive wood and mother-of-pearl.
-Connects people to the lives of Holy Land Christians by sharing their unique stories – the many challenges they face and the rich history they have in the region.Help support the mission of the Franciscan friars here: bit.ly/2rPVdWv

Let your light shine this week. #MondayMotivation ... See MoreSee Less

Let your light shine this week. #MondayMotivation

15 hours ago

Franciscan Monastery

Give back this Holiday Season with a donation to the Franciscan Monastery. Your generosity supports Christian here in Washington, D.C. and in the Holy Land. ... See MoreSee Less

Give back this Holiday Season with a donation to the Franciscan Monastery. Your generosity supports Christian here in Washington, D.C. and in the Holy Land.

Use #MyMonasteryDC to enter your photos into our Monthly Photo Contest! Find all the details here: bit.ly/2LdN0Hs 📸: Instagram user kcarrsmith ... See MoreSee Less

Use #MyMonasteryDC to enter your photos into our Monthly Photo Contest! Find all the details here: bit.ly/2LdN0Hs  📸: Instagram user kcarrsmith

Homily for the 33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

Apocalyptic literature is some of the most difficult to understand in both the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures. We can understand them a little better if we keep certain things in mind as we read.

All apocalyptic literature springs out of difficulties, turmoil, persecutions, or distress which is currently being experienced by the author and the people for whom he is writing. In the case of the Book of Daniel, the persecutions at the decree of Antiochus Epiphanes give rise to the images we read in today’s first reading. In the case of the Gospel of Mark, we know that this Gospel was written just before the first persecution at the command of Emperor Nero in Rome.

The second thing to remember is that this type of literature is to remind the community that such distress is not limited to their own experience. These things have happened in the past, and they will happen again in the future. The author goes to some lengths in expressing this in rather vague terms since he does not know what form that distress will take.

Finally, the author resolves the distress by citing a cosmic resolution, once again going to some lengths to make sure that the audience does not expect that these cosmic events will happen at any specific time, but at a time that only God knows.

Those who would try to use apocalyptic literature to persuade the community that the cosmic resolution is about to happen are forgetting that these events have happened throughout history. Our human existence is fraught with the distress and turmoil. Currently the Christian Churches of the Middle East are being persecuted. Home grown terrorists are slaughtering people in movie theatres, churches, coffee shops, and shopping malls. There are those who would have us believe that these are signs of the end times. Such speculation is a waste of time and energy.

So what function does apocalyptic literature have in the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures? The Book of Daniel was written at a time when faithful Jewish people were living as slaves of the Babylonian Empire. The prophet Daniel uses familiar figures to assure his fellow Jews that God has not forgotten them. What is truly remarkable about this passage is that it is the one and only time in the Hebrew Scriptures that a reference to life after death appears. The Gospel of St. Mark builds upon this thought by reminding the community of Rome that while Nero might be able to destroy them and their homes, God’s word will never pass away. In fact, each sacred author who uses this form or genre is doing so to emphasize an eternal truth; namely, God will prevail. No matter whether the distress is personal or communal, God will prevail. In the face of all the evil in the world, we can say with assurance that God will prevail. When God chooses to send Jesus back to our world, it will be to bring our salvation and to take us home to a place where there is no more fear, no more tears, no more sorrow, and no more distress. As we approach the end of another liturgical year, the Church reminds us very forcefully that, despite the difficulties our society may find us in, God will prevail.

Fr. Lawrence Jagdfeld, O.F.M.
... See MoreSee Less

Homily for the 33rd Sunday in Ordinary TimeApocalyptic literature is some of the most difficult to understand in both the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures.  We can understand them a little better if we keep certain things in mind as we read.All apocalyptic literature springs out of difficulties, turmoil, persecutions, or distress which is currently being experienced by the author and the people for whom he is writing.  In the case of the Book of Daniel, the persecutions at the decree of Antiochus Epiphanes give rise to the images we read in today’s first reading.  In the case of the Gospel of Mark, we know that this Gospel was written just before the first persecution at the command of Emperor Nero in Rome.The second thing to remember is that this type of literature is to remind the community that such distress is not limited to their own experience.  These things have happened in the past, and they will happen again in the future.  The author goes to some lengths in expressing this in rather vague terms since he does not know what form that distress will take.Finally, the author resolves the distress by citing a cosmic resolution, once again going to some lengths to make sure that the audience does not expect that these cosmic events will happen at any specific time, but at a time that only God knows.Those who would try to use apocalyptic literature to persuade the community that the cosmic resolution is about to happen are forgetting that these events have happened throughout history.  Our human existence is fraught with the distress and turmoil. Currently the Christian Churches of the Middle East are being persecuted. Home grown terrorists are slaughtering people in movie theatres, churches, coffee shops, and shopping malls. There are those who would have us believe that these are signs of the end times. Such speculation is a waste of time and energy.So what function does apocalyptic literature have in the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures? The Book of Daniel was written at a time when faithful Jewish people were living as slaves of the Babylonian Empire. The prophet Daniel uses familiar figures to assure his fellow Jews that God has not forgotten them. What is truly remarkable about this passage is that it is the one and only time in the Hebrew Scriptures that a reference to life after death appears. The Gospel of St. Mark builds upon this thought by reminding the community of Rome that while Nero might be able to destroy them and their homes, God’s word will never pass away. In fact, each sacred author who uses this form or genre is doing so to emphasize an eternal truth; namely, God will prevail.  No matter whether the distress is personal or communal, God will prevail. In the face of all the evil in the world, we can say with assurance that God will prevail.  When God chooses to send Jesus back to our world, it will be to bring our salvation and to take us home to a place where there is no more fear, no more tears, no more sorrow, and no more distress.  As we approach the end of another liturgical year, the Church reminds us very forcefully that, despite the difficulties our society may find us in, God will prevail.Fr. Lawrence Jagdfeld, O.F.M.

5 days ago

Franciscan Friars of St. John the Baptist Province

Sr. Rose with words of wisdom.

Franciscan Media
Franciscan Media's Sister Rose offers encouragement to anyone who may wonder if God hears our prayers. Find more Franciscan spirit here: https://bit.ly/2OIxdOu
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Comment on Facebook

Sister Rose is the best!

Hi Sr Rose!!! Remember me? From the Archdiocese. Good to see your face! And hear your wise words once again!

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Local US Franciscan News

The Franciscan HOLY LAND Gift Shop at the Franciscan Monastery:

-Features the products made by these Christians in the Holy Land, helping them live and thrive in the region. All of the artisans are fairly compensated for their work.
-Makes it possible for people to purchase authentic products from the Holy Land without traveling, such as those made from olive wood and mother-of-pearl.
-Connects people to the lives of Holy Land Christians by sharing their unique stories – the many challenges they face and the rich history they have in the region.

Help support the mission of the Franciscan friars here: bit.ly/2rPVdWv
... See MoreSee Less

The Franciscan HOLY LAND Gift Shop at the Franciscan Monastery:-Features the products made by these Christians in the Holy Land, helping them live and thrive in the region. All of the artisans are fairly compensated for their work.
-Makes it possible for people to purchase authentic products from the Holy Land without traveling, such as those made from olive wood and mother-of-pearl.
-Connects people to the lives of Holy Land Christians by sharing their unique stories – the many challenges they face and the rich history they have in the region.Help support the mission of the Franciscan friars here: bit.ly/2rPVdWv

Let your light shine this week. #MondayMotivation ... See MoreSee Less

Let your light shine this week. #MondayMotivation

15 hours ago

Franciscan Monastery

Give back this Holiday Season with a donation to the Franciscan Monastery. Your generosity supports Christian here in Washington, D.C. and in the Holy Land. ... See MoreSee Less

Give back this Holiday Season with a donation to the Franciscan Monastery. Your generosity supports Christian here in Washington, D.C. and in the Holy Land.

Homily for the 33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

Apocalyptic literature is some of the most difficult to understand in both the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures. We can understand them a little better if we keep certain things in mind as we read.

All apocalyptic literature springs out of difficulties, turmoil, persecutions, or distress which is currently being experienced by the author and the people for whom he is writing. In the case of the Book of Daniel, the persecutions at the decree of Antiochus Epiphanes give rise to the images we read in today’s first reading. In the case of the Gospel of Mark, we know that this Gospel was written just before the first persecution at the command of Emperor Nero in Rome.

The second thing to remember is that this type of literature is to remind the community that such distress is not limited to their own experience. These things have happened in the past, and they will happen again in the future. The author goes to some lengths in expressing this in rather vague terms since he does not know what form that distress will take.

Finally, the author resolves the distress by citing a cosmic resolution, once again going to some lengths to make sure that the audience does not expect that these cosmic events will happen at any specific time, but at a time that only God knows.

Those who would try to use apocalyptic literature to persuade the community that the cosmic resolution is about to happen are forgetting that these events have happened throughout history. Our human existence is fraught with the distress and turmoil. Currently the Christian Churches of the Middle East are being persecuted. Home grown terrorists are slaughtering people in movie theatres, churches, coffee shops, and shopping malls. There are those who would have us believe that these are signs of the end times. Such speculation is a waste of time and energy.

So what function does apocalyptic literature have in the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures? The Book of Daniel was written at a time when faithful Jewish people were living as slaves of the Babylonian Empire. The prophet Daniel uses familiar figures to assure his fellow Jews that God has not forgotten them. What is truly remarkable about this passage is that it is the one and only time in the Hebrew Scriptures that a reference to life after death appears. The Gospel of St. Mark builds upon this thought by reminding the community of Rome that while Nero might be able to destroy them and their homes, God’s word will never pass away. In fact, each sacred author who uses this form or genre is doing so to emphasize an eternal truth; namely, God will prevail. No matter whether the distress is personal or communal, God will prevail. In the face of all the evil in the world, we can say with assurance that God will prevail. When God chooses to send Jesus back to our world, it will be to bring our salvation and to take us home to a place where there is no more fear, no more tears, no more sorrow, and no more distress. As we approach the end of another liturgical year, the Church reminds us very forcefully that, despite the difficulties our society may find us in, God will prevail.

Fr. Lawrence Jagdfeld, O.F.M.
... See MoreSee Less

Homily for the 33rd Sunday in Ordinary TimeApocalyptic literature is some of the most difficult to understand in both the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures.  We can understand them a little better if we keep certain things in mind as we read.All apocalyptic literature springs out of difficulties, turmoil, persecutions, or distress which is currently being experienced by the author and the people for whom he is writing.  In the case of the Book of Daniel, the persecutions at the decree of Antiochus Epiphanes give rise to the images we read in today’s first reading.  In the case of the Gospel of Mark, we know that this Gospel was written just before the first persecution at the command of Emperor Nero in Rome.The second thing to remember is that this type of literature is to remind the community that such distress is not limited to their own experience.  These things have happened in the past, and they will happen again in the future.  The author goes to some lengths in expressing this in rather vague terms since he does not know what form that distress will take.Finally, the author resolves the distress by citing a cosmic resolution, once again going to some lengths to make sure that the audience does not expect that these cosmic events will happen at any specific time, but at a time that only God knows.Those who would try to use apocalyptic literature to persuade the community that the cosmic resolution is about to happen are forgetting that these events have happened throughout history.  Our human existence is fraught with the distress and turmoil. Currently the Christian Churches of the Middle East are being persecuted. Home grown terrorists are slaughtering people in movie theatres, churches, coffee shops, and shopping malls. There are those who would have us believe that these are signs of the end times. Such speculation is a waste of time and energy.So what function does apocalyptic literature have in the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures? The Book of Daniel was written at a time when faithful Jewish people were living as slaves of the Babylonian Empire. The prophet Daniel uses familiar figures to assure his fellow Jews that God has not forgotten them. What is truly remarkable about this passage is that it is the one and only time in the Hebrew Scriptures that a reference to life after death appears. The Gospel of St. Mark builds upon this thought by reminding the community of Rome that while Nero might be able to destroy them and their homes, God’s word will never pass away. In fact, each sacred author who uses this form or genre is doing so to emphasize an eternal truth; namely, God will prevail.  No matter whether the distress is personal or communal, God will prevail. In the face of all the evil in the world, we can say with assurance that God will prevail.  When God chooses to send Jesus back to our world, it will be to bring our salvation and to take us home to a place where there is no more fear, no more tears, no more sorrow, and no more distress.  As we approach the end of another liturgical year, the Church reminds us very forcefully that, despite the difficulties our society may find us in, God will prevail.Fr. Lawrence Jagdfeld, O.F.M.
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