News from US Franciscans

#FriarFriday – On the Move

If you are a regular reader of the #FriarFriday posts, you know that there is a quartet of friars who take turns writing these short articles about Franciscan life. What you may not know is that three of these friar-authors—Jim, Michael, and Tom—all are on the move this summer to new assignments.

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Nine Franciscans Profess First Vows

BURLINGTON, Wisc. -- On August 2, 2017, nine men professed first vows in the novitiate chapel at St. Francis Friary here. As friars, friends, and sisters gathered together for this wonderful occasion, the tone of the day was set starting with the first reading. The...

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#FriarFriday – Reconsidering the Habit

The distinctive external symbol of Franciscans friars is the iconic brown habit – the tunic, hood and white cord with three knots. When someone sees someone in the habit, they know immediately that that person is a Franciscan friar.

read more

New Assisi Shrine is Reminder to Shed Attachments

In following Christ, the pope said, “we are all called to be poor, to strip ourselves of our egos; and to do this we must learn how to be with the poor, to share with those who lack basic necessities, to touch the flesh of Christ!

read more

US Franciscans Speak Out on Immigration Ban

The leadership of the US Franciscans have issued a statement against the president's recent travel ban. They say: The recent actions of President Donald J. Trump regarding the treatment of immigrants and refugees entering our country have been troubling to a wide...

read more

News from US Franciscans

#FriarFriday – On the Move

If you are a regular reader of the #FriarFriday posts, you know that there is a quartet of friars who take turns writing these short articles about Franciscan life. What you may not know is that three of these friar-authors—Jim, Michael, and Tom—all are on the move this summer to new assignments.

read more

Nine Franciscans Profess First Vows

BURLINGTON, Wisc. -- On August 2, 2017, nine men professed first vows in the novitiate chapel at St. Francis Friary here. As friars, friends, and sisters gathered together for this wonderful occasion, the tone of the day was set starting with the first reading. The...

read more

#FriarFriday – Reconsidering the Habit

The distinctive external symbol of Franciscans friars is the iconic brown habit – the tunic, hood and white cord with three knots. When someone sees someone in the habit, they know immediately that that person is a Franciscan friar.

read more

New Assisi Shrine is Reminder to Shed Attachments

In following Christ, the pope said, “we are all called to be poor, to strip ourselves of our egos; and to do this we must learn how to be with the poor, to share with those who lack basic necessities, to touch the flesh of Christ!

read more

Recent #FriarFriday Reflections

#FriarFriday – A Franciscan on Vacation

went on a wonderful, beautiful vacation this summer. Why, then, was I so uncomfortable? It has been two years now since my mother died. This summer, my dad invited the whole family on an Alaskan cruise. My four brothers, their wives, and all ten...

read more

#FriarFriday – Reconsidering the Habit

The distinctive external symbol of Franciscans friars is the iconic brown habit – the tunic, hood and white cord with three knots. When someone sees someone in the habit, they know immediately that that person is a Franciscan friar.

read more

Recent #FriarFriday Reflections

#FriarFriday – A Franciscan on Vacation

went on a wonderful, beautiful vacation this summer. Why, then, was I so uncomfortable? It has been two years now since my mother died. This summer, my dad invited the whole family on an Alaskan cruise. My four brothers, their wives, and all ten...

read more

News from the OFM English-speaking Conference

ofm.org posts

US Franciscans statement on Charlottesville violence

8/17/2017 0 Comments FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE | August 2017 As followers of St. Francis of Assisi, the patron of peace, we, the Franciscans Friars of the United States join with the many public and religious leaders and fellow-citizens who have condemned the recent...

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New leadership elected in the Province of Ireland

ENGLISH SPEAKING CONFERENCE | ORDER OF FRIARS MINOR                                                                                                                               Thomas S. Washburn, OFMPO Box 61128  • New Bedford, Massachusetts 02746 • exec@escofm.org ...

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Sacred Heart Province elects new leadership team

ENGLISH SPEAKING CONFERENCE | ORDER OF FRIARS MINOR                                                                                                                               Thomas S. Washburn, OFMPO Box 61128  • New Bedford, Massachusetts 02746 • exec@escofm.org ...

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Leadership elected for ABVM Province

Provincial Minister James GannonRACINE, WISCONSIN - The members of the Province of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary gathered in Provincial Chapter from June 4-8 at Siena Reteat Center here.  During the Chapter, delegates elected a new leadership team for the...

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Friars make mission trip to Cuba

6/1/2017 0 Comments By Jim McIntosh, OFM HAVANA, CUBA – A group of eight U.S. Franciscan friars visited Cuba as part of a mission trip April 22-29, 2017. The friars visited the city of Havana and the towns of Remedios and Trinidad. Friars David Convertino OFM, John...

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Eastern Canadian Province elects new leadership

QUEBEC, CANADA - During their Provincial Chapter taking place this week, the Province of St. Joseph in Eastern Canada elected the following friars to serve the fraternity in leadership:   MINISTER PROVINCIAL: Pierre Charland, OFM. Pierre previously served as Vicar...

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US Franciscans speak out against Muslim ban

By Maria HayesThe Franciscan Friars of the United States have joined a coalition of individuals and organizations of diverse religions in filing an amicus brief challenging the federal administration’s March 6 executive order on immigration, arguing that it...

read more

US Franciscans statement on Charlottesville violence

8/17/2017 0 Comments FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE | August 2017 As followers of St. Francis of Assisi, the patron of peace, we, the Franciscans Friars of the United States join with the many public and religious leaders and fellow-citizens who have condemned the recent...

read more

New leadership elected in the Province of Ireland

ENGLISH SPEAKING CONFERENCE | ORDER OF FRIARS MINOR                                                                                                                               Thomas S. Washburn, OFMPO Box 61128  • New Bedford, Massachusetts 02746 • exec@escofm.org ...

read more

Sacred Heart Province elects new leadership team

ENGLISH SPEAKING CONFERENCE | ORDER OF FRIARS MINOR                                                                                                                               Thomas S. Washburn, OFMPO Box 61128  • New Bedford, Massachusetts 02746 • exec@escofm.org ...

read more

Leadership elected for ABVM Province

Provincial Minister James GannonRACINE, WISCONSIN - The members of the Province of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary gathered in Provincial Chapter from June 4-8 at Siena Reteat Center here.  During the Chapter, delegates elected a new leadership team for the...

read more

News from the General Curia in Rome

ofm.org posts

Franciscan Colors

15 Aug Franciscan Colors Posted on August 15, 2017 in News by Alvin Te, OFM To speak of the color of the habits worn by Franciscans (men and women inspired by the charism of Francis of Assisi) is not an easy task. Throughout the centuries, the families of the first...

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The Pardon of Assisi 2017

02 Aug The Pardon of Assisi 2017 Posted on August 2, 2017 in News by Alvin Te, OFM This year’s anniversary was particularly solemn; given it was the closure of the 800th Anniversary of the Pardon of Assisi. This jubilee was inaugurated on August 2, 2016, by Gualtiero...

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RIP Pat Hudson, OFM

02 Aug RIP Pat Hudson, OFM Posted on August 2, 2017 in News by Alvin Te, OFM It is with great sadness that we inform you of the death of our brother, Pat Hudson. He departed this life on Sunday 30th July in Our Lady’s Hospice, Harold’s Cross, Dublin. He had been sick...

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Feast of St. Clare 2017: Letter of the Minister General

02 Aug Feast of St. Clare 2017: Letter of the Minister General  “But with swift pace and light step…..” (cf. 2LAg, 12) Dear Sisters, May the Lord give you peace! The solemn feast of our Holy Mother St. Clare is an opportunity for us to reflect on contemporary issues...

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Fraternitas 08-09.2017 (No. 247)

01 Aug Fraternitas 08-09.2017 (No. 247) Posted on August 1, 2017 in Fraternitas, Publications by Alvin Te, OFM The August and September 2017 edition of ‘Fraternitas’ is now online and can be downloaded in several languages. PDF:...

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A New Guardian at St. Isidore’s, Rome

28 Jul A New Guardian at St. Isidore’s, Rome Posted on July 28, 2017 in News by Alvin Te, OFM Br. Hugh McKenna OFM, is the new Guardian at St. Isidore’s, Rome, home to the Collegium Sancti Bonaventurae, and to a fraternity which also includes Irish friars in...

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Franciscan Colors

15 Aug Franciscan Colors Posted on August 15, 2017 in News by Alvin Te, OFM To speak of the color of the habits worn by Franciscans (men and women inspired by the charism of Francis of Assisi) is not an easy task. Throughout the centuries, the families of the first...

read more

The Pardon of Assisi 2017

02 Aug The Pardon of Assisi 2017 Posted on August 2, 2017 in News by Alvin Te, OFM This year’s anniversary was particularly solemn; given it was the closure of the 800th Anniversary of the Pardon of Assisi. This jubilee was inaugurated on August 2, 2016, by Gualtiero...

read more

News from our Facebook Page

News from our Facebook Page

Local US Franciscan News

Homily for the 20th Sunday in Ordinary Time

The dogmatic constitution on the Word of God that came out of the Second Vatican Council told us that there were three things that are crucial to understanding the Gospels: the experience of Jesus, the author, and the audience for whom the author wrote.
Each of the Gospels comes to us from a person who has experienced Jesus or who had been taught by someone who has experienced Jesus.

However, the other two factors are different for each of the Gospels. Matthew was a former tax collector who had been called by Jesus, left his scandalous position of cooperating with the Roman occupation, and had been named as one of the Twelve. Matthew’s audience was the community of Jewish Christians in Jerusalem, Jewish men and women who came to place their faith in Jesus. Both Matthew’s life experience as well as his audience color the way he presents the Gospel, the Good News, of Jesus Christ.

Recognizing Matthew’s audience and their culture and social practices is crucial to understanding today’s passage from the Gospel. We know that the Jewish people considered themselves to be God’s chosen people, so we should not be surprised to learn that this community generally thought that if you wanted to be a Christian, you first had to be Jewish. One of the issues that the early Christian community had some difficulty dealing with was the notion of including Gentiles in the community. This is clearly indicated in the Acts of the Apostles which was written by a Gentile, St. Luke.

The culture and society of Israel was segregated. Jewish people simply did not associate with Gentiles as such associations would leave them ritually impure or unclean. Consequently, Jewish people did not enter into Gentile homes or Gentile communities. Conversely Gentiles did not enter into Jewish territory because they were unwelcome in it. So we are immediately caught off guard at the beginning of this Gospel passage that tells us that Jesus “withdrew to the region of Tyre and Sidon.” Once again, Jesus is stretching the margins of his culture and society.

We also know that men and women did not speak in public. So when we hear that a woman called out to Jesus, we are again caught off guard. This is compounded by the fact that the woman is a Gentile. This just wasn’t done. It would have been offensive in the extreme.

So why does the women call out to Jesus? One possible answer is that she was emboldened by the fact that Jesus had done something that was culturally taboo. Perhaps she reasoned that if he could come into her territory, then she could call out to him.

The Gospel tells us that Jesus simply ignored her. That doesn’t seem to work. So the disciples ask him to shoo her away as she is disturbing and offending them by her bold behavior. When she asks him to heal her daughter, Jesus gives the correct Jewish answer. He has come for the children of Israel, a position that would have been very much the thinking of Matthew’s audience. Jesus was for them. However, she presses forward and boldly answers him with a correct assessment of the situation herself.

It is at this point that the story becomes very familiar. Jesus praises the woman’s faith. Her faith has saved her daughter. This is the conclusion of many of the various healing stories of the Gospel. Faith saves.

How would Matthew’s audience have reacted to this story? What would the Jewish Christian community think of Jesus’ actions? What is Matthew trying to convey to this community? As they struggle to come to terms with the notion of Gentiles following Jesus, this story reveals Matthew’s answer to their question. Jesus came to save all.

This really should not have come as too much of a surprise to the Jewish community. The great prophet Isaiah was also a proponent of inclusion. Isaiah tells his community that if Gentiles pass certain tests, they will be included at the great Messianic banquet on the mountain of the Lord. They are to join themselves to the Lord, minister or worship God, love the name of the Lord, become God’s servants, and keep the Sabbath. All who do what is right and just will receive salvation and will realize God’s mercy. Throughout the Hebrew Scriptures, the sacred writers have maintained that God of Israel is the God of all nations. This message is especially prevalent in the prophetic books and in the wisdom literature, particularly in the psalms and proverbs of the Hebrew Scriptures. Unfortunately, it is a message that did not sink in.

St. Paul, a Pharisee schooled in the Hebrew Scriptures is very much aware of this. As he writes to the Jewish Christian community of Rome, he reveals his motivation for preaching to the Gentiles. He is trying to make his fellow Jews jealous so that they will join him in following Jesus. While he is not successful in converting all of his fellow Jews, he does extend God’s kingdom to almost all of the then known world. While St. Paul had one motive, God had a different plan.

I have to admit that coming as it does at this particular moment in our own history, these readings are a message that we need to hear. The past few days and weeks have been filled with distressing events. Once again, our history of segregation in this country has boiled over. The headline on the front page of this week’s “Our Sunday Visitor” blares “Charlottesville and the Need for Healing.” Several Catholic bishops and groups throughout our nation have called for peace after three people died and several others were injured following clashes between pacifists, protesters, and white supremacists. Archbishop Gregory of Atlanta and several others have told us that we must speak out about these events. To remain silent is to agree. Cardinal DiNardo of Galveston-Houston called the abhorrent acts of hatred on display in Charlottesville an attack on the unity of our nation which summon us all to fervent prayer and peaceful action. Archbishop Chaput of Philadelphia called racism the poison of the soul and the original sin of the United States and an illness that has never been healed. The Provincial Ministers of the seven Franciscan Provinces in the United States wrote: We hold that all forms of racism, white supremacy, neo-nazism, xenophobia and hatred are wrong. Because we believe that every person is created by God in love, we also hold that disrespect or diminishment of—or violence against—anyone offends not only that person but also the One who created that person.

The Gospel for this 20th Sunday in Ordinary Time, indeed all the readings for this Sunday, make the exact same point. Just as Matthew wrote to his community of Jerusalem, he writes to us today. All people have been saved through the life and death of Jesus. We are all children of God. We are called to live together in love of God and love of neighbor.
The Church teaches us that the Eucharist we share is the Sacrament of Reconciliation between God and the human family. If we eat and drink at the table of the Lord, the reconciliation we experience must extend to all. We must also embrace all men and women as equal and children of God if we eat and drink the Body and Blood of Jesus worthily.

Fr. Lawrence Jagdfeld, O.F.M.
... See MoreSee Less

Homily for the 20th Sunday in Ordinary TimeThe dogmatic constitution on the Word of God that came out of the Second Vatican Council told us that there were three things that are crucial to understanding the Gospels: the experience of Jesus, the author, and the audience for whom the author wrote.
Each of the Gospels comes to us from a person who has experienced Jesus or who had been taught by someone who has experienced Jesus.
However, the other two factors are different for each of the Gospels.  Matthew was a former tax collector who had been called by Jesus, left his scandalous position of cooperating with the Roman occupation, and had been named as one of the Twelve.  Matthew’s audience was the community of Jewish Christians in Jerusalem, Jewish men and women who came to place their faith in Jesus.  Both Matthew’s life experience as well as his audience color the way he presents the Gospel, the Good News, of Jesus Christ.Recognizing Matthew’s audience and their culture and social practices is crucial to understanding today’s passage from the Gospel. We know that the Jewish people considered themselves to be God’s chosen people, so we should not be surprised to learn that this community generally thought that if you wanted to be a Christian, you first had to be Jewish.  One of the issues that the early Christian community had some difficulty dealing with was the notion of including Gentiles in the community.  This is clearly indicated in the Acts of the Apostles which was written by a Gentile, St. Luke.The culture and society of Israel was segregated.  Jewish people simply did not associate with Gentiles as such associations would leave them ritually impure or unclean.  Consequently, Jewish people did not enter into Gentile homes or Gentile communities.  Conversely Gentiles did not enter into Jewish territory because they were unwelcome in it.  So we are immediately caught off guard at the beginning of this Gospel passage that tells us that Jesus “withdrew to the region of Tyre and Sidon.”  Once again, Jesus is stretching the margins of his culture and society.We also know that men and women did not speak in public.  So when we hear that a woman called out to Jesus, we are again caught off guard. This is compounded by the fact that the woman is a Gentile. This just wasn’t done.  It would have been offensive in the extreme.So why does the women call out to Jesus?  One possible answer is that she was emboldened by the fact that Jesus had done something that was culturally taboo.  Perhaps she reasoned that if he could come into her territory, then she could call out to him.The Gospel tells us that Jesus simply ignored her.  That doesn’t seem to work.  So the disciples ask him to shoo her away as she is disturbing and offending them by her bold behavior.  When she asks him to heal her daughter, Jesus gives the correct Jewish answer.  He has come for the children of Israel, a position that would have been very much the thinking of Matthew’s audience.  Jesus was for them.  However, she presses forward and boldly answers him with a correct assessment of the situation herself.It is at this point that the story becomes very familiar.  Jesus praises the woman’s faith.  Her faith has saved her daughter.  This is the conclusion of many of the various healing stories of the Gospel.  Faith saves.How would Matthew’s audience have reacted to this story?  What would the Jewish Christian community think of Jesus’ actions?  What is Matthew trying to convey to this community?  As they struggle to come to terms with the notion of Gentiles following Jesus, this story reveals Matthew’s answer to their question.  Jesus came to save all.This really should not have come as too much of a surprise to the Jewish community.  The great prophet Isaiah was also a proponent of inclusion.  Isaiah tells his community that if Gentiles pass certain tests, they will be included at the great Messianic banquet on the mountain of the Lord.  They are to join themselves to the Lord, minister or worship God, love the name of the Lord, become God’s servants, and keep the Sabbath.  All who do what is right and just will receive salvation and will realize God’s mercy.  Throughout the Hebrew Scriptures, the sacred writers have maintained that God of Israel is the God of all nations.  This message is especially prevalent in the prophetic books and in the wisdom literature, particularly in the psalms and proverbs of the Hebrew Scriptures.  Unfortunately, it is a message that did not sink in.St. Paul, a Pharisee schooled in the Hebrew Scriptures is very much aware of this.  As he writes to the Jewish Christian community of Rome, he reveals his motivation for preaching to the Gentiles.  He is trying to make his fellow Jews jealous so that they will join him in following Jesus.  While he is not successful in converting all of his fellow Jews, he does extend God’s kingdom to almost all of the then known world.  While St. Paul had one motive, God had a different plan.I have to admit that coming as it does at this particular moment in our own history, these readings are a message that we need to hear.  The past few days and weeks have been filled with distressing events.  Once again, our history of segregation in this country has boiled over.  The headline on the front page of this week’s “Our Sunday Visitor” blares “Charlottesville and the Need for Healing.”  Several Catholic bishops and groups throughout our nation have called for peace after three people died and several others were injured following clashes between pacifists, protesters, and white supremacists.  Archbishop Gregory of Atlanta and several others have told us that we must speak out about these events.  To remain silent is to agree.  Cardinal DiNardo of Galveston-Houston called the abhorrent acts of hatred on display in Charlottesville an attack on the unity of our nation which summon us all to fervent prayer and peaceful action.  Archbishop Chaput of Philadelphia called racism the poison of the soul and the original sin of the United States and an illness that has never been healed. The Provincial Ministers of the seven Franciscan Provinces in the United States wrote: We hold that all forms of racism, white supremacy, neo-nazism, xenophobia and hatred are wrong. Because we believe that every person is created by God in love, we also hold that disrespect or diminishment of—or violence against—anyone offends not only that person but also the One who created that person.The Gospel for this 20th Sunday in Ordinary Time, indeed all the readings for this Sunday, make the exact same point.  Just as Matthew wrote to his community of Jerusalem, he writes to us today.  All people have been saved through the life and death of Jesus.  We are all children of God.  We are called to live together in love of God and love of neighbor.
The Church teaches us that the Eucharist we share is the Sacrament of Reconciliation between God and the human family.  If we eat and drink at the table of the Lord, the reconciliation we experience must extend to all.  We must also embrace all men and women as equal and children of God if we eat and drink the Body and Blood of Jesus worthily.Fr. Lawrence Jagdfeld, O.F.M.

24 hours ago

SW Franciscans

... See MoreSee Less

 

Comment on Facebook

Yeah Fr. Charlie

1 day ago

SW Franciscans

On Aug. 16th (Wednesday), during the Holy Mass which Fr. Jose Gutay presided, we celebrated the 50th anniversary of Religious profession of Bro. John Friebel, Bro. Bart Wolf and Sr. Joleen CSA (Congregation of St. Agnes). In the right photo we have Bros. John & Bart and Sr. Joleen. It was taken last Wednesday. The other older photo was taken on the same day 25 years ago on the occasion of their 25th anniversary of religious profession. Sr. Joleen is the lady on the extreme right next to Bro. John. ... See MoreSee Less

On Aug. 16th (Wednesday), during the Holy Mass which Fr. Jose Gutay presided, we celebrated the 50th anniversary of Religious profession of Bro. John Friebel, Bro. Bart Wolf and Sr. Joleen CSA (Congregation of St. Agnes).  In the right photo we have Bros. John & Bart and Sr. Joleen. It was taken last Wednesday. The other older photo was taken on the same day 25 years ago on the occasion of their 25th anniversary of religious profession. Sr. Joleen is the lady on the extreme right next to Bro. John.

Edgardo Dìaz ya le di me gusta aunque no le entiendo nada de lo que dice pues no se nada de ingles. Saludos. ... See MoreSee Less

“I’ll keep thinking and praying,” says Br. Michael Charron in regards to his work in the courtroom and mediation. “I’m sure I’ll land in a good spot.” Part of being a Franciscan is “trying to make peace. Even though it’s kind of forced in the courtroom, this is a place where peace is made. I think this is a good place for friars to be.”
Read more at: http://franciscan.org/what-we-do#friarswork
... See MoreSee Less

“I’ll keep thinking and praying,” says Br. Michael Charron in regards to his work in the courtroom and mediation. “I’m sure I’ll land in a good spot.” Part of being a Franciscan is “trying to make peace. Even though it’s kind of forced in the courtroom, this is a place where peace is made. I think this is a good place for friars to be.”
Read more at:  http://franciscan.org/what-we-do#friarswork

If you’ve never attended a Polka Mass, here’s your chance. Family Fun Day, one of the biggest events of the year at St. Francis Retreat House, kicks off at 1 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 20, in the chapel. The Changing Times Quartet accompanies a liturgy you never forget. A picnic – only $5 for homemade food and treats – follows from 2:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. on the lawn. The ever-popular Tricky Tray is back, along with a raffle that includes $1,800 in cash prizes. Join the friars at one of the prettiest places in Easton, Pa.
Learn more: https://stfrancisretreathouse.wordpress.com/picnic…
... See MoreSee Less

If you’ve never attended a Polka Mass, here’s your chance. Family Fun Day, one of the biggest events of the year at St. Francis Retreat House, kicks off at 1 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 20, in the chapel. The Changing Times Quartet accompanies a liturgy you never forget. A picnic – only $5 for homemade food and treats – follows from 2:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. on the lawn. The ever-popular Tricky Tray is back, along with a raffle that includes $1,800 in cash prizes. Join the friars at one of the prettiest places in Easton, Pa.
Learn more: https://stfrancisretreathouse.wordpress.com/picnic/

U.S. provincial ministers have released a statement condemning the violence that erupted last weekend in Charlottesville, Va. It reads in part:

“To avoid future instances of the tragic violence that tore not only the community of Charlottesville but also the fabric of our nation, we call for a renewed commitment to respectful dialogue by all, whereby our opinions and differences can be shared in constructive and illuminating ways that lead to the possibility of growth and conversion for all.”

Read the entire statement here: http://escofm.org/news/…
... See MoreSee Less

U.S. provincial ministers have released a statement condemning the violence that erupted last weekend in Charlottesville, Va. It reads in part:“To avoid future instances of the tragic violence that tore not only the community of Charlottesville but also the fabric of our nation, we call for a renewed commitment to respectful dialogue by all, whereby our opinions and differences can be shared in constructive and illuminating ways that lead to the possibility of growth and conversion for all.”Read the entire statement here: http://www.escofm.org/news/us-franciscans-statement-on-charlottesville-violence

 

Comment on Facebook

Thank you for posting this. I think the Bishops should have said something too. This is a good moment for teaching and leadership.

God starts us out perfectly and we sure make a mess of things.

3 days ago

SW Franciscans

This Sunday's Gospel ends with two thought-provoking sentences from Jesus spoken to the woman who has asked dramatic healing for her daughter. Take it in, and see if any part of this resonates with your relationship with God and God's relationship with you:

'Then Jesus said to her in reply,
"O woman, great is your faith!
Let it be done for you as you wish." '
__

With our reality of racism and violence this past week--
here's a bit of humor to calm you down:

Lost on a rainy night, a nun stumbles across a monastery and requests shelter there. Fortunately, she's just in time for dinner and is treated to the best fish and chips she's ever had.
After dinner, she goes into the kitchen to thank the chefs. She is met by two brothers. "Hello, I'm Brother Michael, and this is Brother Charles."
"I'm very pleased to meet you," said the nun. "I just wanted to thank you for a wonderful dinner. The fish and chips were the best I've ever tasted. Out of curiosity, who cooked what?"
"I'm the fish friar," said one.
"And I'm the chip monk," said the other.
_________

'Go into all the world and preach the gospel to all creation.' Mk 16:15

..... peace..... Bro. Mark...... "Franciscans for Justice"
... See MoreSee Less

This Sundays Gospel ends with two thought-provoking sentences from Jesus spoken to the woman who has asked dramatic healing for her daughter. Take it in, and see if any part of this resonates with your relationship with God and Gods relationship with you:Then Jesus said to her in reply,
O woman, great is your faith!
Let it be done for you as you wish.
__With our reality of racism and violence this past week--
heres a bit of humor to calm you down:Lost on a rainy night, a nun stumbles across a monastery and requests shelter there. Fortunately, shes just in time for dinner and is treated to the best fish and chips shes ever had.
After dinner, she goes into the kitchen to thank the chefs. She is met by two brothers. Hello, Im Brother Michael, and this is Brother Charles.
Im very pleased to meet you, said the nun. I just wanted to thank you for a wonderful dinner. The fish and chips were the best Ive ever tasted. Out of curiosity, who cooked what?
Im the fish friar, said one.
And Im the chip monk, said the other.
_________Go into all the world and preach the gospel to all creation. Mk 16:15..... peace..... Bro. Mark...... Franciscans for Justice

Local US Franciscan News

Homily for the 20th Sunday in Ordinary Time

The dogmatic constitution on the Word of God that came out of the Second Vatican Council told us that there were three things that are crucial to understanding the Gospels: the experience of Jesus, the author, and the audience for whom the author wrote.
Each of the Gospels comes to us from a person who has experienced Jesus or who had been taught by someone who has experienced Jesus.

However, the other two factors are different for each of the Gospels. Matthew was a former tax collector who had been called by Jesus, left his scandalous position of cooperating with the Roman occupation, and had been named as one of the Twelve. Matthew’s audience was the community of Jewish Christians in Jerusalem, Jewish men and women who came to place their faith in Jesus. Both Matthew’s life experience as well as his audience color the way he presents the Gospel, the Good News, of Jesus Christ.

Recognizing Matthew’s audience and their culture and social practices is crucial to understanding today’s passage from the Gospel. We know that the Jewish people considered themselves to be God’s chosen people, so we should not be surprised to learn that this community generally thought that if you wanted to be a Christian, you first had to be Jewish. One of the issues that the early Christian community had some difficulty dealing with was the notion of including Gentiles in the community. This is clearly indicated in the Acts of the Apostles which was written by a Gentile, St. Luke.

The culture and society of Israel was segregated. Jewish people simply did not associate with Gentiles as such associations would leave them ritually impure or unclean. Consequently, Jewish people did not enter into Gentile homes or Gentile communities. Conversely Gentiles did not enter into Jewish territory because they were unwelcome in it. So we are immediately caught off guard at the beginning of this Gospel passage that tells us that Jesus “withdrew to the region of Tyre and Sidon.” Once again, Jesus is stretching the margins of his culture and society.

We also know that men and women did not speak in public. So when we hear that a woman called out to Jesus, we are again caught off guard. This is compounded by the fact that the woman is a Gentile. This just wasn’t done. It would have been offensive in the extreme.

So why does the women call out to Jesus? One possible answer is that she was emboldened by the fact that Jesus had done something that was culturally taboo. Perhaps she reasoned that if he could come into her territory, then she could call out to him.

The Gospel tells us that Jesus simply ignored her. That doesn’t seem to work. So the disciples ask him to shoo her away as she is disturbing and offending them by her bold behavior. When she asks him to heal her daughter, Jesus gives the correct Jewish answer. He has come for the children of Israel, a position that would have been very much the thinking of Matthew’s audience. Jesus was for them. However, she presses forward and boldly answers him with a correct assessment of the situation herself.

It is at this point that the story becomes very familiar. Jesus praises the woman’s faith. Her faith has saved her daughter. This is the conclusion of many of the various healing stories of the Gospel. Faith saves.

How would Matthew’s audience have reacted to this story? What would the Jewish Christian community think of Jesus’ actions? What is Matthew trying to convey to this community? As they struggle to come to terms with the notion of Gentiles following Jesus, this story reveals Matthew’s answer to their question. Jesus came to save all.

This really should not have come as too much of a surprise to the Jewish community. The great prophet Isaiah was also a proponent of inclusion. Isaiah tells his community that if Gentiles pass certain tests, they will be included at the great Messianic banquet on the mountain of the Lord. They are to join themselves to the Lord, minister or worship God, love the name of the Lord, become God’s servants, and keep the Sabbath. All who do what is right and just will receive salvation and will realize God’s mercy. Throughout the Hebrew Scriptures, the sacred writers have maintained that God of Israel is the God of all nations. This message is especially prevalent in the prophetic books and in the wisdom literature, particularly in the psalms and proverbs of the Hebrew Scriptures. Unfortunately, it is a message that did not sink in.

St. Paul, a Pharisee schooled in the Hebrew Scriptures is very much aware of this. As he writes to the Jewish Christian community of Rome, he reveals his motivation for preaching to the Gentiles. He is trying to make his fellow Jews jealous so that they will join him in following Jesus. While he is not successful in converting all of his fellow Jews, he does extend God’s kingdom to almost all of the then known world. While St. Paul had one motive, God had a different plan.

I have to admit that coming as it does at this particular moment in our own history, these readings are a message that we need to hear. The past few days and weeks have been filled with distressing events. Once again, our history of segregation in this country has boiled over. The headline on the front page of this week’s “Our Sunday Visitor” blares “Charlottesville and the Need for Healing.” Several Catholic bishops and groups throughout our nation have called for peace after three people died and several others were injured following clashes between pacifists, protesters, and white supremacists. Archbishop Gregory of Atlanta and several others have told us that we must speak out about these events. To remain silent is to agree. Cardinal DiNardo of Galveston-Houston called the abhorrent acts of hatred on display in Charlottesville an attack on the unity of our nation which summon us all to fervent prayer and peaceful action. Archbishop Chaput of Philadelphia called racism the poison of the soul and the original sin of the United States and an illness that has never been healed. The Provincial Ministers of the seven Franciscan Provinces in the United States wrote: We hold that all forms of racism, white supremacy, neo-nazism, xenophobia and hatred are wrong. Because we believe that every person is created by God in love, we also hold that disrespect or diminishment of—or violence against—anyone offends not only that person but also the One who created that person.

The Gospel for this 20th Sunday in Ordinary Time, indeed all the readings for this Sunday, make the exact same point. Just as Matthew wrote to his community of Jerusalem, he writes to us today. All people have been saved through the life and death of Jesus. We are all children of God. We are called to live together in love of God and love of neighbor.
The Church teaches us that the Eucharist we share is the Sacrament of Reconciliation between God and the human family. If we eat and drink at the table of the Lord, the reconciliation we experience must extend to all. We must also embrace all men and women as equal and children of God if we eat and drink the Body and Blood of Jesus worthily.

Fr. Lawrence Jagdfeld, O.F.M.
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Homily for the 20th Sunday in Ordinary TimeThe dogmatic constitution on the Word of God that came out of the Second Vatican Council told us that there were three things that are crucial to understanding the Gospels: the experience of Jesus, the author, and the audience for whom the author wrote.
Each of the Gospels comes to us from a person who has experienced Jesus or who had been taught by someone who has experienced Jesus.
However, the other two factors are different for each of the Gospels.  Matthew was a former tax collector who had been called by Jesus, left his scandalous position of cooperating with the Roman occupation, and had been named as one of the Twelve.  Matthew’s audience was the community of Jewish Christians in Jerusalem, Jewish men and women who came to place their faith in Jesus.  Both Matthew’s life experience as well as his audience color the way he presents the Gospel, the Good News, of Jesus Christ.Recognizing Matthew’s audience and their culture and social practices is crucial to understanding today’s passage from the Gospel. We know that the Jewish people considered themselves to be God’s chosen people, so we should not be surprised to learn that this community generally thought that if you wanted to be a Christian, you first had to be Jewish.  One of the issues that the early Christian community had some difficulty dealing with was the notion of including Gentiles in the community.  This is clearly indicated in the Acts of the Apostles which was written by a Gentile, St. Luke.The culture and society of Israel was segregated.  Jewish people simply did not associate with Gentiles as such associations would leave them ritually impure or unclean.  Consequently, Jewish people did not enter into Gentile homes or Gentile communities.  Conversely Gentiles did not enter into Jewish territory because they were unwelcome in it.  So we are immediately caught off guard at the beginning of this Gospel passage that tells us that Jesus “withdrew to the region of Tyre and Sidon.”  Once again, Jesus is stretching the margins of his culture and society.We also know that men and women did not speak in public.  So when we hear that a woman called out to Jesus, we are again caught off guard. This is compounded by the fact that the woman is a Gentile. This just wasn’t done.  It would have been offensive in the extreme.So why does the women call out to Jesus?  One possible answer is that she was emboldened by the fact that Jesus had done something that was culturally taboo.  Perhaps she reasoned that if he could come into her territory, then she could call out to him.The Gospel tells us that Jesus simply ignored her.  That doesn’t seem to work.  So the disciples ask him to shoo her away as she is disturbing and offending them by her bold behavior.  When she asks him to heal her daughter, Jesus gives the correct Jewish answer.  He has come for the children of Israel, a position that would have been very much the thinking of Matthew’s audience.  Jesus was for them.  However, she presses forward and boldly answers him with a correct assessment of the situation herself.It is at this point that the story becomes very familiar.  Jesus praises the woman’s faith.  Her faith has saved her daughter.  This is the conclusion of many of the various healing stories of the Gospel.  Faith saves.How would Matthew’s audience have reacted to this story?  What would the Jewish Christian community think of Jesus’ actions?  What is Matthew trying to convey to this community?  As they struggle to come to terms with the notion of Gentiles following Jesus, this story reveals Matthew’s answer to their question.  Jesus came to save all.This really should not have come as too much of a surprise to the Jewish community.  The great prophet Isaiah was also a proponent of inclusion.  Isaiah tells his community that if Gentiles pass certain tests, they will be included at the great Messianic banquet on the mountain of the Lord.  They are to join themselves to the Lord, minister or worship God, love the name of the Lord, become God’s servants, and keep the Sabbath.  All who do what is right and just will receive salvation and will realize God’s mercy.  Throughout the Hebrew Scriptures, the sacred writers have maintained that God of Israel is the God of all nations.  This message is especially prevalent in the prophetic books and in the wisdom literature, particularly in the psalms and proverbs of the Hebrew Scriptures.  Unfortunately, it is a message that did not sink in.St. Paul, a Pharisee schooled in the Hebrew Scriptures is very much aware of this.  As he writes to the Jewish Christian community of Rome, he reveals his motivation for preaching to the Gentiles.  He is trying to make his fellow Jews jealous so that they will join him in following Jesus.  While he is not successful in converting all of his fellow Jews, he does extend God’s kingdom to almost all of the then known world.  While St. Paul had one motive, God had a different plan.I have to admit that coming as it does at this particular moment in our own history, these readings are a message that we need to hear.  The past few days and weeks have been filled with distressing events.  Once again, our history of segregation in this country has boiled over.  The headline on the front page of this week’s “Our Sunday Visitor” blares “Charlottesville and the Need for Healing.”  Several Catholic bishops and groups throughout our nation have called for peace after three people died and several others were injured following clashes between pacifists, protesters, and white supremacists.  Archbishop Gregory of Atlanta and several others have told us that we must speak out about these events.  To remain silent is to agree.  Cardinal DiNardo of Galveston-Houston called the abhorrent acts of hatred on display in Charlottesville an attack on the unity of our nation which summon us all to fervent prayer and peaceful action.  Archbishop Chaput of Philadelphia called racism the poison of the soul and the original sin of the United States and an illness that has never been healed. The Provincial Ministers of the seven Franciscan Provinces in the United States wrote: We hold that all forms of racism, white supremacy, neo-nazism, xenophobia and hatred are wrong. Because we believe that every person is created by God in love, we also hold that disrespect or diminishment of—or violence against—anyone offends not only that person but also the One who created that person.The Gospel for this 20th Sunday in Ordinary Time, indeed all the readings for this Sunday, make the exact same point.  Just as Matthew wrote to his community of Jerusalem, he writes to us today.  All people have been saved through the life and death of Jesus.  We are all children of God.  We are called to live together in love of God and love of neighbor.
The Church teaches us that the Eucharist we share is the Sacrament of Reconciliation between God and the human family.  If we eat and drink at the table of the Lord, the reconciliation we experience must extend to all.  We must also embrace all men and women as equal and children of God if we eat and drink the Body and Blood of Jesus worthily.Fr. Lawrence Jagdfeld, O.F.M.

24 hours ago

SW Franciscans

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Yeah Fr. Charlie

1 day ago

SW Franciscans

On Aug. 16th (Wednesday), during the Holy Mass which Fr. Jose Gutay presided, we celebrated the 50th anniversary of Religious profession of Bro. John Friebel, Bro. Bart Wolf and Sr. Joleen CSA (Congregation of St. Agnes). In the right photo we have Bros. John & Bart and Sr. Joleen. It was taken last Wednesday. The other older photo was taken on the same day 25 years ago on the occasion of their 25th anniversary of religious profession. Sr. Joleen is the lady on the extreme right next to Bro. John. ... See MoreSee Less

On Aug. 16th (Wednesday), during the Holy Mass which Fr. Jose Gutay presided, we celebrated the 50th anniversary of Religious profession of Bro. John Friebel, Bro. Bart Wolf and Sr. Joleen CSA (Congregation of St. Agnes).  In the right photo we have Bros. John & Bart and Sr. Joleen. It was taken last Wednesday. The other older photo was taken on the same day 25 years ago on the occasion of their 25th anniversary of religious profession. Sr. Joleen is the lady on the extreme right next to Bro. John.

Edgardo Dìaz ya le di me gusta aunque no le entiendo nada de lo que dice pues no se nada de ingles. Saludos. ... See MoreSee Less

“I’ll keep thinking and praying,” says Br. Michael Charron in regards to his work in the courtroom and mediation. “I’m sure I’ll land in a good spot.” Part of being a Franciscan is “trying to make peace. Even though it’s kind of forced in the courtroom, this is a place where peace is made. I think this is a good place for friars to be.”
Read more at: http://franciscan.org/what-we-do#friarswork
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“I’ll keep thinking and praying,” says Br. Michael Charron in regards to his work in the courtroom and mediation. “I’m sure I’ll land in a good spot.” Part of being a Franciscan is “trying to make peace. Even though it’s kind of forced in the courtroom, this is a place where peace is made. I think this is a good place for friars to be.”
Read more at:  http://franciscan.org/what-we-do#friarswork

If you’ve never attended a Polka Mass, here’s your chance. Family Fun Day, one of the biggest events of the year at St. Francis Retreat House, kicks off at 1 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 20, in the chapel. The Changing Times Quartet accompanies a liturgy you never forget. A picnic – only $5 for homemade food and treats – follows from 2:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. on the lawn. The ever-popular Tricky Tray is back, along with a raffle that includes $1,800 in cash prizes. Join the friars at one of the prettiest places in Easton, Pa.
Learn more: https://stfrancisretreathouse.wordpress.com/picnic…
... See MoreSee Less

If you’ve never attended a Polka Mass, here’s your chance. Family Fun Day, one of the biggest events of the year at St. Francis Retreat House, kicks off at 1 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 20, in the chapel. The Changing Times Quartet accompanies a liturgy you never forget. A picnic – only $5 for homemade food and treats – follows from 2:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. on the lawn. The ever-popular Tricky Tray is back, along with a raffle that includes $1,800 in cash prizes. Join the friars at one of the prettiest places in Easton, Pa.
Learn more: https://stfrancisretreathouse.wordpress.com/picnic/

U.S. provincial ministers have released a statement condemning the violence that erupted last weekend in Charlottesville, Va. It reads in part:

“To avoid future instances of the tragic violence that tore not only the community of Charlottesville but also the fabric of our nation, we call for a renewed commitment to respectful dialogue by all, whereby our opinions and differences can be shared in constructive and illuminating ways that lead to the possibility of growth and conversion for all.”

Read the entire statement here: http://escofm.org/news/…
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U.S. provincial ministers have released a statement condemning the violence that erupted last weekend in Charlottesville, Va. It reads in part:“To avoid future instances of the tragic violence that tore not only the community of Charlottesville but also the fabric of our nation, we call for a renewed commitment to respectful dialogue by all, whereby our opinions and differences can be shared in constructive and illuminating ways that lead to the possibility of growth and conversion for all.”Read the entire statement here: http://www.escofm.org/news/us-franciscans-statement-on-charlottesville-violence

 

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Thank you for posting this. I think the Bishops should have said something too. This is a good moment for teaching and leadership.

God starts us out perfectly and we sure make a mess of things.

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